2021 Year in Review

2021 Retrospective

Legend has been in development for 2.3 years. It’s hard to believe that that much time has passed since I started working on the game. I don’t know if anyone else has experienced this, but how I felt at the two-year mark was in stark contrast to my feelings at the one-year mark. After the first year of development, I was thrilled with how much I had accomplished and excited for the future. At two years, panic set in. How could I possibly finish at the rate I was going? Was I wasting my time? Was this game even any good? 

Ultimately, the mid-gamedev crisis was a good thing. This was my brain telling me to reassess and correct course. That’s exactly what I did in the latter part of the year. The reality was that, at the rate Legend was progressing, it would need at least several more years to release. I don’t want to wait that long (I have more games to do!). I cut a large chunk of planned features while preserving the original vision. I forced myself to make decisions. I have a tendency to postpone decisions as long as possible to avoid limiting possibilities. It’s been a sure-fire way of keeping completion in the distant future.

Development thus far has consisted primarily of building the game system framework, and rebuilding many facets of the framework as my Unity knowledge increased and my ideas crystalized. Heading into 2022, the framework is done and development shifts to using the framework to flesh out the actual game.

What I said I was going to do in 2021:

Replacing the stock art

Completion: 0%

I’m still using Oryx. I still have some uncertainty about the exact 2D perspective that will be used. I also feel that the art doesn’t need to be replaced until the game is ready for a public release.

More content 

Completion: 5%

A handful of new enemies, items, and objects were added. Every piece of existing content was reworked in some way, for example extracting a parent class for actors and items, and moving from room-based to element-based map generation.

More polish

Completion: 30%

At the beginning of 2021, I never would have expected to accomplish as much as I did in this area. I considered polish something you do at the end of development. That largely is the case, but I’m using “polish” loosely here to refer to any visual and audio effects beyond the bare minimum, and refinement of any sort, such as fine tuning procedural generation and balancing combat. The game looked bad and felt dull whenever I did testing. Even though I knew I’d improve the look and feel before launch, I was still getting discouraged. For my own psychological benefit more than anything else, I added some game juice, including:

  • Particle effects
  • Better combat and movement animations 
  • Screen shake
  • Environmental impact: corpses, particle effect residue
  • Sound effects

Visuals | Sound Effects

This did the trick; I could finally envision other people playing the game.

Community building

Completion: 5%

I posted a weekly dev update on the website and Sharing Saturday on r/roguelikedev. I posted the link to each Sharing Saturday update on Twitter. I occasionally posted videos on Youtube. I have tiny followings on those channels. I continued to spend a minimal amount of time on community in favor of game development.

Early access release (aspirational goal)

Completion: 10%

This was nowhere close to happening, but there was movement toward this goal due to focusing on it at the end of the year. I also created a mind map visualizing features by release and a roadmap.

What else happened in 2021:

The new map generator, started in 2020, was finished in January. I built some dev tools for procedural generation analysis, tuning, and troubleshooting: an interactive map generation visualizer and a map graph visualizer. These proved to be very handy.

A map graph

I made another major change to map generation later in the year with the addition of Map Elements. These are the basic building blocks for populating a map with content after the map structure’s been created. They’re hierarchical and modular, enabling rooms to be constructed from layers of interchangeable components and reuse common components. For example, many room types can include an Abandoned Map Element that adds cobwebs and debris to give the appearance that the room is abandoned.

Maps became both more varied and more playable. Map configuration parameters, which dictate a map’s structure (number of rooms, room sizes, room distances, room themes, etc.) are now randomized. This additional layer of procedural generation increased the variety of maps while maintaining consistency within a map. Map configuration parameter ranges were fine-tuned to avoid problematic maps. Room type probability changed from a linear distribution to a weighted distribution based on rarity to give maps a more logical composition of rooms.

Significant UI work was done. New screens were added, a hotbar was added, and the main game UI was refined. 

Class selection screen
Inventory and hotbar

In action:

AI was expanded. Now, actors can have their own AI controllers and behave differently than other actors. AI controllers can be reused across multiple actor types. Actors can now track any number of other actors, enabling them to do much more than charging the player. They can attack, defend, and interact in other ways with tracked actors as dictated by their AI controller. Actors now gain awareness of events based on their vision and hearing ranges and act based on the type of event occurring. Each actor has its own inventory and the ability to pick up items and use them. When an actor dies, other actors can acquire the items it was carrying.

In light of my time constraints and the mountain of work remaining, I made a deliberate effort throughout the year to increase my productivity. The ways in which I did this include:

  • Reducing and simplifying code.
  • Moving logic from code to configuration (physical material interactions, game events).
  • Adding unit testing.
  • Adding an in-game console for spawning objects to accelerate playtesting. 
  • Adding more granular logging so that I have more information to troubleshoot.
  • Consolidating test settings into a single design-time editable object.
  • Switching my IDE from Visual Studio to Rider.
  • Reorganizing my Unity editor layout.
Reorganized Unity Editor layout

Finally, code rework occurred throughout the year. Most of it was necessary to keep the code maintainable, but I also know that I am overly eager to rework code and sometimes create more problems for myself than I solve. As the year progressed, the rework did slow down. There are two reasons for this: 1) the framework reached maturity and 2) I became more selective with when I reworked code. Before I make changes or add new features, I now consider what compromises I can make and what I can do within the existing framework to avoid rework. 

2022 Outlook

This year’s goals are essentially the same as last year’s. However, the priorities have changed. An early access release is now the primary goal. Original art, a requirement for the release, is also a top priority. Effort will be concentrated on what is absolutely necessary for public release, including tightening the game loop, balancing, and clearing the bug list.