Weekly Update – August 5, 2022

Testing the Resurrection spell
Eggs
  • Resurrection ability particle effects. I mentioned last week that implementing Resurrection was simple. However, this week I hit a snag when I tried adding particle effects. The particle effects were triggered to start at the same time that the Resurrection effect itself started. This didn’t look right because the corpse would change to a living actor just as the particle effects were starting. I added a new Action Step for particle effects so that the particle effects could run in parallel with the Effect Action Step. Then I added a delay parameter to the Effect Action Step so that it could start half a second after the particle effects started. Now the actor appears to come back to life half-way through the particle effect emission and looks much better.
  • AI fixes. I fixed some problems that were rooted in my losing track of what the ActorTracker class is supposed to do. Actors are designed to only act when they need to, which is typically when they see another actor that they’re interested in. This is done for efficiency; the game would be too slow if every actor in the level acted on every turn.  The ActorTracker class was created to allow an actor to continue acting after it can no longer see any actors that it’s interested in, enabling the actor to pursue another actor temporarily. At some point, I started using this class to permanently track actors that an actor was interested in, and built logic on top of this new use case. When the player’s actor was instantiated, every enemy in the level added the player to its ActorTracker. That caused every enemy to check if it could see the player at the start of each turn. This is an expensive check when the player is in the enemy’s sight range, because line of sight is used to confirm that the enemy can see the player. Aside from the performance issues, the shift in how ActorTracker was used broke AI. And, ironically, pursuing actors that were no longer visible, which was the original purpose of ActorTracker, didn’t even work anymore. To solve these problems, I went to my best tools for walking through complicated flows: graph paper and a pen. I diagrammed the AI steps, located the logic flaws, and fixed them in the code. I scaled ActorTracker back to its original purpose and added comments to help me remember its scope in the future.
  • Chest and corpse user experience design. One of the oldest items on my todo list is getting chests fully working. This has been held up by incomplete design. Until this week, I hadn’t determined how the player would interact with chests, and how that would translate to the user interface. I’ve been putting off making that determination until I played some other roguelikes and CRPG’s to get a sense of how other games handled this. Downloading, installing, and playing multiple games until I found a chest seemed too time-consuming, so I resorted to watching a bunch of Youtube videos to find examples. The latter was much more efficient. 

Next week, I’ll get chests fully working and fix bugs along the way.

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